Thursday, March 16, 2017

Hitting Pause and Hitting the Road #SOL17 Day 16 #EF



Coastal view of Cinque Terre on the eastern Mediterranean.
Image via Google search, labeled for noncommercial reuse.
When I began this hike through the Slice of Life Story Challenge, I knew I'd face the added challenge of posting daily during spring break since I'll be tripping around Europe for eleven days. 

The SOLSC corresponds to spring break, and I travel during spring break. 

Last year my husband and I went to Hawaii for nine days. Still, I managed to post every day, often getting up early and staying up late to compose lines about the beauty of Hawaii. 

Two years ago I traveled to London, Paris, Rome, and Barcelona, with side trips to Bath, Stonehenge, Versailles, and Vatican City. I continued blogging during the 13 day trip but did miss a couple of days because of time changes and no internet availability. 

Some of my personal favorite posts have been inspired by summer road trips. I like sharing my awe-inspiring travel experiences. 

This year, however, I've decided to hit pause and eschew blogging during my travels. I don't want to miss a moment of the beauty of Europe I'll be sharing with my husband, friends, colleagues, and students, as well as the new friends I'll make during this year's travels to 

  • Milan
  • Cinque Terra
  • Monte Carlo
  • Barcelona and 
  • Madrid
We'll have side trips to some other places, too, including a day trip to Toledo, which is an hour from Madrid. 

Simply, I can't be present in two places at one time, so I'm choosing to be in the moment with my beloved man, my best friend, my soulmate, and the others sharing our journey for the next eleven days. 

To be there, I can't be here, so I'm hitting pause and hitting the road. 
March marks the month-long Slice of Life Story Challenge.Thank you to the Two Writing Teachers team for sponsoring this month's challenge and for promoting the writing life.
*I'll be back March 27. 

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Exclamation Points in My Teaching Day #SOL17 Day 15

I shared the NYT obituary for Amy Krause Rosenthal with students in my general speech classes Wednesday. These students are currently preparing eulogies of teaches, a project I wrote about last spring, and AKR's death offered a sad but timely teaching moment.

After, I read Exclamation Mark! to the classes. I purchased the book because it's about a punctuation mark, and I thought it would offer a fun way to teach students about their unique ways of standing out from others as well as provide a fun lesson on the importance of punctuation. 

Certainly, Amy lived life with the full vitality of many exclamation marks. 

My day was punctuated by lots of exclamation points, mainly from the rush to get things done before leaving on spring break. 

For teachers, however, the real excitement, the professional exclamation points, arrive as students. Today offered many stand out moments. Here are a few:

  • My Communication 1101 students delivered the best first day of speeches ever. I heard informative speeches about 
    • the history of makeup
    • eyebrow abrasion
    • cockroaches
    • Toni Morrison
    • CTE: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
    • Buddy Holly
    • Celiac disease and 
    • Trombones (technically delivered Monday)
  • My AP Literature and Composition students peer evaluated their As I Lay Dying and Song of Solomon essays using the "Way to Go/Way to Grow" strategy I taught earlier this year. I eavesdropped on their conversations and am amazed at their perception and honesty in critiquing one another, as well as their reflections on their own writing as they read their papers to their groups. 
  • I ate dinner at school with some colleagues and administrators who all stayed late to assist incoming freshman with registration for the 2017-2018 school year. During our time with next year's ninth graders, I met some lovely young people and their parents and enjoyed the company of some of my colleagues. 
In teaching, we find lots of little ways each moment and each student stands out from the rest. 

Breanna and Abby arrived prepared to deliver
their speeches wearing matching skirts.













Tuesday, March 14, 2017

And I Saw Guernica #SOL17 Day 14

Pablo Picasso. Guernica, 1937. Oil on canvas. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina SofĂ­a collection, Madrid

During my recent trip to Madrid, Spain, I visited the Reina Sophia Museum where Pablo Picasso's anti-war painting Guernica" is on permanent display. Getting to see "Guernica" fulfilled a longtime dream of mine and without question was the most moving art-viewing experience of my lifetime. 

Picasso painted "Guernica" after the Basque town Guernica was bombed by German Nazis and Italian fascists at the request of Franco during the Spanish Civil War on April 26, 1937. The morning after the bombing, Picasso saw a newspaper report of the atrocities and sought a way to paint a memory that would become engrained in the collective consciousness and remain there long after we see the painting. 

When I showed an image of "Guernica" to my students, they first noticed that animals and humans all "scream" from the painting. Next, they mentioned the twisted and impaled bodies. One student mentioned decapitated bodies and heads without bodies. We talked about the "hash" marks and various meanings. Perhaps they are graves. Perhaps they are news reports. Perhaps they represent a tally of the dead. 

I included "Guernica" as part of a "Poetry and Art in Conversation" unit and introduced the unit with the painting, to which I'll add T. S. Eliot's "The Hollow Men." Both works resonate as powerful modernist works that articulate the fragmentation of war and critique its value. 

"Guernica" is a large painting, and its size contributes to the emotional experience of seeing it. I also find it fascinating that the Reina Sophia Museum was once a hospital. It's corridors are arched, giving it a cathedral-like quality that invites reverence from visitors.
The "Guernica" gallery at the Reina Sophia. Google image
labeled for noncommercial reuse. 
As with many museums, Reina Sophia does not allow photography, so I found an image online for this post. It does not begin to do justice to Picasso's masterpiece. First, the color is off. "Guernica" has a grayish-blue hue to it, and a photo does not reveal the many hidden images Picasso sketched into the painting. 

As I began sharing my experience of seeing "Guernica" with my students, I felt myself overcome with emotion. "Guernica" is now a part of me, and is as embedded in my memory as strongly as Eliot's words at the end of "The Hollow Men":

This is the way the world ends.
This is the way the world ends.
This is the way the world ends.
Not with a bang but a whimper. 
March marks the month-long Slice of Life Story Challenge.Thank you to the Two Writing Teachers team for sponsoring this month's challenge and for promoting the writing life.

Monday, March 13, 2017

"I Contain Multitudes" #SOL17 Day 13

I contain multitudes.
I am a teacher.
         ----Glenda Funk

Recently, I copied and pasted one of those Facebook posts penned by an anonymous author. This one resonated with me because it spoke to the ways people live complicated lives. 

The post began 

For all of you who aren't sure, it is possible to be...

From there, the writer lists the binaries inherent in each person and concludes

We are all walking contradictions of what 'normal' looks like. Let humanity love and win.

Walt Whitman has something to say about this idea that we are walking, talking contradictions in "Song of Myself," from Leaves of Grass

Do I contradict myself? 
Very well then I contradict myself,
(I am large, I contain multitudes.)

As much as it is a celebration of the spirit of individualism, "Song of Myself" also offers tribute to the multitudes that live and dwell and work and play in the United States of America. 

It is possible to be an individual, and it is possible to be part of e pluribus unum. We are literally "from many one." That idea embodies the American paradox, that seemingly self-contradictory ideal that expresses an essential truth about our nation. 

I find it fitting that Whitman chooses to add the lines about being a contradiction toward the end of "Song of Myself." They are in section 51 of 52!

To find ourselves, our national identity, we need only look to Whitman:

I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love,
If you want me again look for me under your boot-soles. 

We should not lose sight of Whitman's words. We are all, regardless of party affiliation, religion, racial identity, gender, occupation, or other, part of the grass, the fiber of America if we call this place home. 

And Whitman admonishes us to lift our voices as the embodiment of contradictions, the containers of multiples:

I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world. 

That's because 

I contain multitudes.
I am a teacher.

And each time I lift my voice, I speak as myself and the totality of my experiences with each student I've known. 
March marks the month-long Slice of Life Story Challenge.Thank you to the Two Writing Teachers team for sponsoring this month's challenge and for promoting the writing life.








Sunday, March 12, 2017

Color Your World with Writing Slices #SOL17 Day 12

“Did you ever want to be a writer?” “No,” she said, and she would have told him. “I only wanted to be a reader.” Ann Patchett, Commonwealth.
After seeing the Libra Bray meme featuring slices of oranges posted on today's TWT blog call for Day 12, my mouth tingled and I thought about slices, a variety of delectable slices of writing that feed my soul when I'm tired, exhaustion born from Saturday's marathon of writing and editing. 

Having a slice of time stolen by a return to Daylight Saving Time, I decided I'd simply slice slices and feature them this Sunday. 

When I write, I see lemons. 
Sometimes when others read my writing, they taste lemonade.

I have a list of "50 Blog Post Ideas" for when the cacophony of thoughts 
clanging in my head, begging for a slice, go silent and abandon me for neglecting them.

A blog post, by its very nature, embodies green. It's an idea quickly penned, 
often the first thought that enters my mind as I open this platform, 
as when I hurry to dress after hitting snooze three times too often.

How often do I eat a pomegranate? Rarely. Yet when I do, I wonder why 
I don't more often. For me, writing is like that. I
 don't write often enough and wonder why when 
I write something that works.

When I dig into an idea, inspired by markings notched in my mind, 
occasionally a splatter of genius gobsmacks me and the words work magic.

I'll never understand how one idea can take on many hues. 
Words do it, too.

Kiwi writing is my specialty. 
Thoughts full of fuzz await peeling. 

I'm hunched over ideas, picking them from the black keys touching my fingers. 
These ideas remind me of the migrant workers I knew in Arizona.
Their hands bent toward the fruit in a permanent arc, the pain of which
refuses to ease its hold. I feel that way when pecking at these keys I ask to yield the fruit of words.

If you plan words, they might yield Honey Crisp apples. 
Ask Johnny Appleseed.

Some ideas can't be sweetened with fluff. 

I prefer tomatoes to ketchup the way 
I prefer the classics to popular romance. 

Sometimes all the right words gather in a line, 
and I can't resist sampling every one.
The way words connect to form a whole 
reminds me of the ways slices form a community of writers. 

*This month I've struggled with what often feels like the "duty" of writing. I have not felt contentment or satisfaction from my participation in the #SOL Story Challenge. I've thought daily about quitting and have had to push myself to remember that writing is in no small way a solitary, self-indulgent enterprise. I don't know if anyone will read this post, but I do know writing it was for me cathartic after a day of obligatory writing born from professional responsibility. That alone makes this a fruitful slicing moment. 
March marks the month-long Slice of Life Story Challenge.Thank you to the Two Writing Teachers team 
for sponsoring this month's challenge and for promoting the writing life.