Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Teacher Tunnel Podcast and Intentional Teaching #SOL17 #TeacherTunnel

The new logo for the Teacher Tunnel Podcast
Great literature is about telling truths through untruths. 

I'm quoting myself above and referring to my recent guest appearance on the Teacher Tunnel Podcast, hosted by Jon Belt, an Oklahoma City educator from Oklahoma Cit. Jon used my comment about literature as a lead-in to the podcast and on his blog notes from the podcast, which is #28 and titled 

LESSONS FROM A MASTER TEACHER

Jon used my participation in the NEA Better Lesson Master Teacher Project in his description of me. I'll let others decide whether or not he's right! 

A note on the podcast website offers Jon's purpose in producing TEACHER TUNNEL:  

The Teacher Tunnel Podcast is an entertaining and authentic look at the teacher leaders in education and beyond. What are their habits, routines, and strategies? As a teacher and learner, Jon Belt wants to bring great people and thinkers to the surface and share their thoughts and insights about teaching, learning, self-improvement, and education.

The old logo!
Jon and I connected via my brother Steve. Steve works for the Broken Arrow, Oklahoma school district and met Jon via professional channels. 

This was my first time as a podcast guest, and I found Jon to be a gracious host who makes me sound better than I am. He sent me a questionnaire and opened the interview with questions designed to get to know me as an individual first and then as a teacher. These questions echo the PROUST QUESTIONNAIRE I've adapted for classroom use. 

At its heart the TEACHER TUNNEL PODCAST shares stories from the lives of educators. These stories remind me of the kind of intentional teacher I strive to be and that heading back to school I'm struggling to achieve. 

A highlight of my appearance, for me anyway, is our discussion of doing our part in our classrooms when so much in education is beyond our control. I also used the podcast to push myself to blog today because I certainly did not feel like posting, but the act of writing helps my soul, something I need right now. 

My hope is that my teacher story will serve others in education as they navigate both their personal and professional lives during these challenging times. 

Through the years, one of the things that helps me get through rough years, which I suspect this coming year will be, is trying to live up to some of the honors I've received. Will my colleagues hear the podcast and think it represents me and that I'm honest in my responses? Do I practice the core values and standards of the NBPTS? Am I a good representative of the NEA Master Teacher Project? 

These are questions that weigh on my mind when I struggle and want to give up, as I have the past two days. A couple of weeks ago a teacher left a comment for me on the Better Lesson website that reminds me that I have a responsibility to educators I don't know, that I have a responsibility to myself in terms of rising to my own expectations: 

I feel like you are my spirit guide. I have been perusing your lesson plans for Beowulf and The First Days of School. There are so many things I have tried and/or wanted to do but just couldn't find the perfect activity to tie it together...until now. Thank you for sharing these lessons and your creativity with other teachers. I can't wait to see how some of these ideas transform my classroom!

I'm grateful to Jon Belt for his selfless act of sharing teachers' lives. I know this and other educational podcast are labors of love and commitment to teachers and students. 

Teaching often feels like a crawl through a dark space, a virtual tunnel that frequently finds us groping and struggling to find a light. The TEACHER TUNNEL PODCAST offers many aha moments for and from educators as Jon shines his light on the lights of teachers. 

*I encourage you to subscribe via iTunes or on your Android device. 

**Winner of my recent book giveaway for a copy of Beth Kephart's Tell the Truth: Make It Matter is Susan Barber. Congratulations, Susan. Check out the AP Lit Help blog that Susan runs. It's not just for AP Lit teachers. 




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